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Naomi (also "Neomi") Polani (Hebrew: נעמי פולני‎‎, born in 1927, in Tel Aviv) is an Israeli musical director, theater director, singer, producer, actress, and dancer.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7]

Music career

Polani founded the singing group "HaTarnegolim" ("The Chickens") in 1960, and was in charge of musical and acting direction, and choreography.[8][9][10] The original group included Yehoram Gaon and HaGashash HaHiver.[10][11][12] It was referred to by The Jerusalem Post as "one of the most exciting things that ever happened to Israeli pop. They brought us some of the greatest hits of all times".[10] Among the group's hits were "The Neighborhood Song," "Everything's Gold," and "My Great Kid Yossi."[10] Over 30 years later, Polani worked with a new group to create a comeback of the group.[10][13]

References

  1. ^ Motti Regev, Edwin Seroussi (2004). Popular music and national culture in Israel. Retrieved 31 July 2011. 
  2. ^ Virginia R. Domínguez (1989). People as subject, people as object: selfhood and peoplehood in contemporary Israel. Retrieved 31 July 2011. 
  3. ^ Helen Kaye (13 February 1989). "Artists' Honour". The Jerusalem Post. Retrieved 31 July 2011. 
  4. ^ "News in Brief". Haaretz. 22 April 2011. Retrieved 31 July 2011. 
  5. ^ Dori, Roni (22 April 2011). "Perpetual motion". Haaretz. Retrieved 31 July 2011. 
  6. ^ "נעמי פולני, מתוך תיאטרון – אנציקלופדיה". Ynetl. 20 June 1995. Retrieved 1 August 2011. 
  7. ^ "A Ruth, a Naomi, and more: Celebrating Women Israeli Artists". The iCenter. 29 June 2008. Retrieved 1 August 2011. 
  8. ^ Don Rubin (1999). The World Encyclopedia of Contemporary Theatre: Europe. Retrieved 31 July 2011. 
  9. ^ Motti Regev, Edwin Seroussi (2004). Popular music and national culture in Israel. Retrieved 31 July 2011. 
  10. ^ a b c d e Ury Eppstein, Michael Ajzenstadt (13 June 1999). "These chicks have got to grow". The Jerusalem Post. Retrieved 31 July 2011. 
  11. ^ Motti Regev, Edwin Seroussi (2004). Popular music and national culture in Israel. Retrieved 31 July 2011. 
  12. ^ Don Rubin (1999). Contemporary Theatre: Europe. Retrieved 31 July 2011. 
  13. ^ Barry Davis (12 October 2000). "Succot forecast: Festival fever". The Jerusalem Post. Retrieved 31 July 2011.