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Adam Brodsky is a locally popular anti-folk singer from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1][2][3] In 2003, he attained the Guinness World Record for the Fastest Tour by Solo Performer with 50 shows in 50 states in 50 days.

Background

Brodsky frequently refers to himself as "the Dork", or "Dorkboy". To highlight this, he has a tattoo, similar to Robert Indiana's sculpture, portrayed in Philadelphia's LOVE Park, proclaiming him a DORK. His songs typically feature self-deprecation, religion (especially Judaism), suicide, and rejection. His albums often include banter made between sets during performances.

His self-owned label is Permanent Records, which he started in the mid-1990s.[1][3] Among the artists who have recorded under it are Todd Young,[3] Butch Ross, EDO, Greg Simon, Pete Chambers and Steph Hayes.

In 2000, he was named the Best Folk Performer in the Philadelphia City Paper Music Awards.[4] That year, he also developed a side project called, "A Brief History of Folk Music." Contrary to his raucous shows, it was primarily aimed at children.[5]

Between August 3, 2003 and September 21, 2003, Brodsky set the Guinness World Record for the Fastest Tour by Solo Performer with 50 shows in 50 states in 50 days, and then performed in Washington DC the following night.[6][7][8][9]

Brodsky allows audience members to record his live performances. In 2003, Mary Krause of Permanent Records gave permission for fan-made recordings of Brodsky's shows to be hosted on the Internet Archive. Download his shows here on Archive.org

Adam removed himself a self-imposed "hibernation" and went back on the road in April 2008 with shows in Hoboken, NJ; Boston, MA; Schenectady, NY and Ithaca, NY, with Steph Hayes from Steph Hayes and The Good Problems.[10]

Discography

  • Deeply Flawed
  • Dork Radio EP
  • Dork (1997)[11]
  • Folk Remedy (2000)[12]
  • Hookers, Hicks, and Heebs (2003)[1]
  • Under the Covers (promotional)
  • "No More Luxuries", hidden track on the Jim Carroll Band Tribute, "Put Your Tongue to the Rail", 1999.

References

  1. ^ a b c M.J. Fine (November 27, 2002). "Diesel Dork". Philadelphia City Paper. Retrieved January 25, 2010. 
  2. ^ Rosemary Darigo (May 4, 2000). "Adam Brodsky". Philadelphia City Paper. Retrieved January 25, 2010. 
  3. ^ a b c A.D. Amorosi (October 1, 1998). "Bringing It All Back Home". Philadelphia City Paper. Retrieved January 25, 2010. 
  4. ^ Brian Howard (September 28, 2000). "Hear Here". Philadelphia City Paper. Retrieved January 25, 2010. 
  5. ^ Adam Brodsky, Antifolkonline.com, Retrieved January 25, 2010
  6. ^ "5 Questions With Adam Brodsky". The State (newspaper). August 1, 2003. Retrieved January 25, 2010. 
  7. ^ Kevin Hopper (September 12, 2003). "Travelin' man aims for record". Albuquerque Journal. Retrieved January 25, 2010. 
  8. ^ "Adam Brodsky". Sing Out!. January 1, 2004. Retrieved January 25, 2010. ("Hats off to punk-folk singer-songwriter Adam Brodsky who completed his ambitious '50 States...")
  9. ^ World Record Authenticated: A Nation Rejoices, AdamBrodsky.com (February 13, 2004), Retrieved January 25, 2010
  10. ^ A Small Tour To The North, AdamBrodsky.com (March 28, 2008), Retrieved January 25, 2010
  11. ^ "Todd Young & Adam Brodsky". Philadelphia City Paper. June 11, 1998. Retrieved January 25, 2010. 
  12. ^ M.J. Fine (November 18, 1999). "Adam Brodsky/Butch Ross: Folk Remedy/Selected Works of Friction". Philadelphia City Paper. Retrieved January 25, 2010.